Arabian gods #6 Allāt or al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎)

Allāt or al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎) was a Pre-Islamic Arabian goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. She is mentioned in the Qur’an (Sura 53:19), which indicates that pre-Islamic Arabs considered her as one of the daughters of Allah along with Manāt and al-‘Uzzá.

Especially in older sources, Allat is an alternative name of the Mesopotamian goddess of the underworld, now usually known as Ereshkigal. She was reportedly also venerated in Carthage under the name Allatu. Continue reading

Arabian gods #5

#5 Al-Qaum
Al-Qaum (Arabic: القوم‎) was the Nabataean god of war and the night, and guardian of caravans.

Large numbers of inscriptions bearing his name have been found, and archaeologists believe that he was a major god of the Nabataean pantheon.

Al-Qaum however also literally translates to ‘the people’ in formal Arabic, it might just be referring to a group of people at the time as an entity

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Arabian gods #4

#4 Al-Qaum
Al-Qaum (Arabic: القوم‎) was the Nabataean god of war and the night, and guardian of caravans.

Large numbers of inscriptions bearing his name have been found, and archaeologists believe that he was a major god of the Nabataean pantheon.

Al-Qaum however also literally translates to ‘the people’ in formal Arabic, it might just be referring to a group of people at the time as an entity.

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Arabian gods #3

#3 Allah
In pre-Islamic Arabia, Allah was used by Meccans as a reference to the creator-god, possibly the supreme deity. Allah was not considered the sole divinity; however, Allah was considered the creator of the world and the giver of rain. The notion of the term may have been vague in the Meccan religion. Allah was associated with companions, whom pre-Islamic Arabs considered as subordinate deities. Meccans held that a kind of kinship existed between Allah and the jinn. Allah was thought to have had sons and that the local deities of al-ʿUzzā, Manāt and al-Lāt were His daughters. The Meccans possibly associated angels with Allah. Allah was invoked in times of distress. Muhammad’s father’s name was ʿAbd-Allāh meaning “the slave of Allāh”. Continue reading

Arabian gods #2

#2 Aglibol
Aglibôl was a lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means “Calf of Bel” (“Calf of the Lord”).

Aglibôl is depicted with a lunar halo decorating his head and sometimes his shoulders, and one of his attributes is the sickle moon.

Aglibôl is linked with the sun god Yarḥibôl in a famous trinity. He is also associated with the Syrian versions of Astarte “Venus” and with Arṣu “Evening Star”.

Aglibôl’s cult continued into Hellenic times and was later extended to Rome.

References

Encyclopedia of Gods, Michael Jordon, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002

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Arabian gods #1

#1 Abgal (god)
Abgal (cognate with the sumerian ab.gal, related to the akkadian apkallu, “ferryman”) is a pre-Islamic north Arabian god, known from the Palmyrian desert regions as a god of Bedouins and camel drivers.[1]

References

1. ^ Jordan, Michael (July 1993). Encyclopedia of Gods: Over 2,500 Deities of the World. Facts on File. ISBN 978-0-8160-2909-9.

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