Pedophile Pirate

Source : http://prophetofdoom.net/Prophet_of_Doom_13_The_Pedophile_Pirate.Islam

“When the Prophet married Aisha she was very young and not yet ready for consummation.”

Chairman Muhammad settled into his public housing project and immediately began to act like the fool he had become. Ishaq:235 “In the year of the Prophet’s arrival, Abu Umamah died from a rattling in the throat. The Messenger said, ‘His death is an evil thing for the Jews and the Arab Hypocrites for they are sure to say, “If Muhammad were really a prophet his companion would not have died.” But truly, I have no power with Allah either for myself or for my companions.'” Truer words were never spoken.

Muhammad had no morals either. Tabari VII:7 “The Prophet married Aisha in Mecca three years before the Hijrah, after the death of Khadija. At the time she was six.” Ishaq:281 “When the Apostle came to Medina he was fifty-three.” Tabari VII:6 “In May, 623 A.D./A.H. 1, Allah’s Messenger consummated his marriage to Aisha.” He would be dead in ten years; she hadn’t lived that long. Pedophilia was, and continues to be, child abuse. The abused had come full circle; he was now an abuser. Continue reading

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By thedivinefire Posted in Islam Tagged

Islam Lies

Islam..a Beast

They start accumulating in countries and then start terrorizing it with gangs of rapists, violence and civil disruption.

They are possessed, demon possessed. They seek to spread fear and violence, they are pawns of the devil who feeds off of the fear and suffering they create for power.

Just as their leader, Mohammad, they use “God” as an excuse to prey on innocent people. Mohammad was a robber and a thief, his followers are no different. Continue reading

By thedivinefire Posted in Islam Tagged

Arabian gods #6 Allāt or al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎)

Allāt or al-Lāt (Arabic: اللات‎) was a Pre-Islamic Arabian goddess who was one of the three chief goddesses of Mecca. She is mentioned in the Qur’an (Sura 53:19), which indicates that pre-Islamic Arabs considered her as one of the daughters of Allah along with Manāt and al-‘Uzzá.

Especially in older sources, Allat is an alternative name of the Mesopotamian goddess of the underworld, now usually known as Ereshkigal. She was reportedly also venerated in Carthage under the name Allatu. Continue reading

Arabian gods #5

#5 Al-Qaum
Al-Qaum (Arabic: القوم‎) was the Nabataean god of war and the night, and guardian of caravans.

Large numbers of inscriptions bearing his name have been found, and archaeologists believe that he was a major god of the Nabataean pantheon.

Al-Qaum however also literally translates to ‘the people’ in formal Arabic, it might just be referring to a group of people at the time as an entity

Blessed to Bless

Arabian gods #4

#4 Al-Qaum
Al-Qaum (Arabic: القوم‎) was the Nabataean god of war and the night, and guardian of caravans.

Large numbers of inscriptions bearing his name have been found, and archaeologists believe that he was a major god of the Nabataean pantheon.

Al-Qaum however also literally translates to ‘the people’ in formal Arabic, it might just be referring to a group of people at the time as an entity.

Blessed to Bless

Arabian gods #3

#3 Allah
In pre-Islamic Arabia, Allah was used by Meccans as a reference to the creator-god, possibly the supreme deity. Allah was not considered the sole divinity; however, Allah was considered the creator of the world and the giver of rain. The notion of the term may have been vague in the Meccan religion. Allah was associated with companions, whom pre-Islamic Arabs considered as subordinate deities. Meccans held that a kind of kinship existed between Allah and the jinn. Allah was thought to have had sons and that the local deities of al-ʿUzzā, Manāt and al-Lāt were His daughters. The Meccans possibly associated angels with Allah. Allah was invoked in times of distress. Muhammad’s father’s name was ʿAbd-Allāh meaning “the slave of Allāh”. Continue reading

Arabian gods #2

#2 Aglibol
Aglibôl was a lunar deity in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra. His name means “Calf of Bel” (“Calf of the Lord”).

Aglibôl is depicted with a lunar halo decorating his head and sometimes his shoulders, and one of his attributes is the sickle moon.

Aglibôl is linked with the sun god Yarḥibôl in a famous trinity. He is also associated with the Syrian versions of Astarte “Venus” and with Arṣu “Evening Star”.

Aglibôl’s cult continued into Hellenic times and was later extended to Rome.

References

Encyclopedia of Gods, Michael Jordon, Kyle Cathie Limited, 2002

Blessed to Bless

Arabian gods #1

#1 Abgal (god)
Abgal (cognate with the sumerian ab.gal, related to the akkadian apkallu, “ferryman”) is a pre-Islamic north Arabian god, known from the Palmyrian desert regions as a god of Bedouins and camel drivers.[1]

References

1. ^ Jordan, Michael (July 1993). Encyclopedia of Gods: Over 2,500 Deities of the World. Facts on File. ISBN 978-0-8160-2909-9.

Blessed to Bless

Ancient Arabian Mythology

Ancient Arabian mythology

Arab’s collection of gods:
▪ Aglibol
▪ Allah
▪ Al-Qaum
▪ al-Lāt, al-‘Ilāhat
▪ Astarte
▪ Atargatis (Syrian)
▪ Atarsamain
▪ Beelshamen
▪ Bēl, Baʕl, Bēl-Šamīn
▪ Bes (Egypto-Arabic)
▪ Dhu’l-Halasa

Arabian mythology is the ancient, pre-Islamic beliefs of the Arab people. Prior to Islam the Kaaba of Mecca was covered in symbols representing the myriad demons, djinn, demigods, or simply tribal gods and other assorted deities which represented the polytheistic culture of pre-Islamic Arabia. It has been inferred from this plurality an exceptionally broad context in which mythology could flourish. Many of the physical descriptions of the pre-Islamic gods are traced to idols, especially near the Kabba, which is asserted to have contained up to 360. Continue reading

The Blessing of God’s Spiritual Influence 

By BAYLESS CONLEY

In the beginning of Isaiah 55, God invites His people to come to Him and fellowship with Him.  In verses 3 and 6 God says,

 

“Incline your ear, and come to Me.  Hear, and your soul shall live….  Seek the LORD while He may be found, call upon Him while He is near.” 

In verses 10-11, we are told what happens to those who respond to this invitation, to God’s call to come and seek Him and listen to Him, Continue reading